Cinepub


Review: The King’s Speech by Jamie

Royalty. As a British person I spend at least twenty-three hours a day thinking about it, even whilst sleeping. My morning begins by sorting out my pound notes by denomination and saluting the picture of the Queen on each one before singing the national anthem to the government issued poster of her that comes in a variety of different versions including a tasteful swimsuit edition.

As such it was my duty to go and watch The King’s Speech, a film about our current monarch’s father, George VI (Played by Colin Firth in the film) , who took over the position of King of England after his brother (Guy Pearce) abdicated the throne to marry a twice divorced American woman. The story of the film begins long before the abdication crisis, though it certainly plays a pivotal part in the plot, at the 1925 Empire Exhibition where the then Prince Albert, Duke of York has to give a speech at exhibition’s closing. Unfortunately the speech is a bit of a failure thanks to the Prince’s severe stutter.

After several unsuccessful attempts to try and fix the problem with various different treatments, his wife Elizabeth, the Duchess of York (Helena Bonham Carter) gets him an appointment with an Australian speech therapist by the name of Lionel Logue (Geoffrey Rush). The film then follows the two as they try and fix Prince Albert’s condition both through exercises and trying to get to the psychological root of the problem. It also charts the growing friendship between the two, overcoming difficulties together such as the aforementioned abdication of Edward VIII, the Prince becoming a King and just what such a position means in a time when the title doesn’t really denote any kind of real political power.

That’s pretty much all of the synopsis I really feel like going into because I honestly want to spoil as little of this film as possible. I know some will say that you can’t spoil a film based on a true story but fuck you. Not everyone knows the story. I knew elements of it like the whole abdication thing but I didn’t even know that George VI had a stammer so that was new. It’s not really the kind of thing that’s taught in history class.

So how was the film? Well, I was honestly surprised by just how much I enjoyed it. Everything just seemed to come together. The acting was of the highest order, though I’ll concede the fact that there were times when Colin Firth could have reigned things in a little bit better but that’s a very, very small criticism of an otherwise near perfect performance. It was certainly nice to see Helena Bonham Carter playing someone who wasn’t bats hit insane or just weird for the sake of being weird and Geoffrey Rush was insanely likeable as the Australian who started of as a simple speech therapist and became the friend of a King.

It was also shot and directed wonderfully as well. There are a lot of shots of people just talking without much else going on but that’s fine for me. I’ve always been someone who has valued good story telling over flashy visuals and this film was put together in exactly the right way for the story being told. Not that there aren’t some interesting things going on. There are two scenes in particular that stand out, one where Albert is talking to his brother about Hitler during a party and another when Logue and the Prince are walking through a park in an incredibly foggy London discussing the possibility of Albert becoming King.

Also I don’t if it’s simply because I am British but found the subject matter far, far more interesting than I thought I would. I’ve always been interested by history but when I first heard about what the film was about I’ll admit it sounded a bit boring but I was very, very wrong. It’s fascinating to see the days of Britain gone by, back when we still had the last remnants of an Empire, so-called ‘colonials’ were looked down upon somewhat and things in Europe were starting to take a turn for the worst. It was also interesting to see get a glimpse into the private lives of the Royal Family, even one from the past. Of course, some things are changed for dramatic or artistic reasons. For example I did think it was a bit odd just how involved Winston Churchill was during the films climactic scenes considering he wasn’t Prime Minister yet and, indeed, wikipedia reveals that he wouldn’t have been involved at all but he’s a historical character that the audience would recognise far better than most of the people who were actually there so I can understand his inclusion.

If I have one criticism, and to be honest it’s not really this films fault, it’s just how many good British actors have been involved with the Harry Potter franchise and therefore show up in this film as well. I suppose it’s not really a criticism but it was somewhat distracting and it just took me out of the film a bit. I mean you’ve got Dumbledore, Bellatrix and that dude who turned into a rat all in this film and yeah… I suppose it’s my problem, not the film. At one point I was half expecting a flash back to the King’s younger years where he was being played by Daniel Radcliffe or something. Again, just a thing that bugged me personally.

Oh, and one final thing before I forget, the film is very, very funny. A hell of a lot funnier then I was expecting but it also has a lot of heart and at no point is the stammer itself ever really used for a cheap laugh, though some of the techniques used to attempt to cure it certainly are. Well, not cheap laughs. Good, awesome and I assume expensive laughs or something.

So yeah, when all’s said and done, I really, really enjoyed this film and heartily recommend it to everyone. Everyone. And the Queen enjoyed it as well saying she was “touched by a moving portrayal of her father” so I am literally duty bound to give this film five pints out of five. Laterz.

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Review: Harry Potter And The Deathly Hallows: Part 1 by Jamie

Well the end is nigh for the Harry Potter series and it begins with this film, ‘Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1’ or Harry Potter 7 for brevity’s sake. Yes it’s been a long, strange trip with it’s ups and its down but how does this film fare as the opening of the close? Let’s find out.

So the basic story is that of Harry, Hermione and Ron roaming Britain trying to find and destroy the horcruxes that contain Voldermort’s soul and the effects that the Dark Lord’s return are having on the wizarding world in general. That’s pretty much it. It’s a pretty simple story and yet it manages to be complex in it’s simplicity. Wow, that might be the wankiest thing I’ve ever written.

Wanky or not, it’s true. The film manages to be both incredibly simple yet deep and complex at the same time. The biggest change from earlier films is that all of the action takes place outside of Hogwarts. Gone are the little whimsical touches that were littered throughout that school in general. Instead what you get is a far more realistically grounded film. Yes, you still have people using magic and that but there’s no keys with insect wings or talking portraits. It’s much more serious fare.

And with good reason. This is a very, very dark film compared to others in the series. For one thing, there’s a very fascistic overtone to Voldermort’s overtaking of the Ministry of Magic. The parallels are obvious with Nazi Germany. There’s a scene where they are actually creating propaganda entitled ‘Mudbloods And The Danger They Pose To A Perfect Pure Blood Society.’ So yeah, you don’t really need to scratch the surface too much to find the analogy.

What I am surprised by is just how far they’re willing to take everything for what is still technically a kids film. There are scenes of Hermione screaming as she’s tortured by having the word ‘mudblood’ scrawled into her skin, an opening scene where someone is killed because they promote the ideas of muggles and wizards ‘mating’ (as Voldermort puts it) and a beautifully animated sequence about three wizards and their encounters with Death himself. Beautiful but dark.

There’s been much talk about the number of scenes where the trio are just camping with some saying that the film is basically just that but I honestly didn’t feel as if that was dragged out at all. In fact the film seemed to be paced relatively well, perhaps a little slow here and there but not egregiously so. Still, that doesn’t mean that there aren’t some problems with the film. For example, one of the horcruxes they find is a locket which, when worn, turns the person wearing it into a bit of a douche bag so my question is why wear it? Hermione had a magical Mary Poppins-esque bag so why not just keep it in there?

Importantly, this is also the first film where the story of the kids was the most interesting part of the film. In earlier instalments I found myself not really caring what the youngest generation of wizards and witches got up to, caring far more about the story of the adults. In fact I really wouldn’t mind a prequel that told the story of Voldermort’s rise to power the first time around and the death of Harry’s parents/ This time round, however, it was all about kids without much input from the adults at all and I went into the film thinking I might have some problems but the story was engaging enough that I didn’t really mind at all.

Still over all, it is a highly, highly enjoyable film. Just don’t see it if you haven’t seen the films that came before it because you really do need to know the story up to this point in order to follow it. I also have to say I wouldn’t recommend it for younger children, no matter how much they beg. Seriously, that scene with Hermione screaming continuously for what seemed like forever was almost too much for me and I like dark shit. Oh and thank fuck there’s no fucking Quidditch. That’s gotta make it one of the best in the series so far. Anyway, overall 4 pints out of five. Laterz.



Zombie Month: Colin by Jamie

Zombies. As much as I love them, they’re not exactly have the most sparkling personalities of the monster world. They’re not seductive or lamenting of their curse like Vampires or Werewolves. No, they’re basically just walking corpses with a hunger for living flesh and aren’t really known for their conversation skills.

So I approached the film ‘Colin’ with a slight bit of scepticism because the basic premise is that our protagonist, Colin, becomes a Zombie within the first few minutes of the film and then we follow his journey as one of the Walking Dead. The fact that the film was allegedly made for around £45 didn’t do much to ease my… uneasiness. I’m not saying that low budget films can’t be good but they can definitely suffer for it and to have such an extreme low budget is enough to make a man think twice.

Still, I gave it a go and honestly, I’m fairly glad that I did. The plot isn’t far beyond what I’ve already stated. Just a Zombie wandering through a Zombie Apocalypse ravaged city in Britain. As he goes from place to place, you get little snapshots of what’s going on around him. He comes across various survivors all trying to cope in different ways with the end of the world. Some of them try to steal his shoes, some are weird Irish men who keep Zombie girls in their basement and some are relatives who recognise him and want him to recognise them.

Saying anything more than that would probably be travelling in to spoiler territory. Though, it’d be kind of hard to spoil this film. Nothing really happens yet at the same time so much is happening. For the most part, Colin is an impassionate observer apart from the scenes involving his family. He just shuffles along, occasionally taking the odd bite out of the odd corpse or incapacitated living person though his desire for flesh doesn’t seem to be as strong as that of his Zombie brethren. There are a number of times when he seems to pass up on a relatively easy meal, choosing instead to just walk on by.

There are certain clues through out the film to exactly what mental level Colin is operating on though it’s never made entirely clear. Does he forgo eating someone because they remind him of a person he knew whilst alive? Does he recognise his family on same basic level but, by the time they have him trapped in their kitchen has it been so long since he last had a meal that his Zombie instincts are over-riding his brain? It’s difficult to say.

The most important thing about the film is that, despite being a flesh-eating walking corpse, Colin is a sympathetic character. When bad things happen to him, you feel sorry for him. There’s a scene where he falls into a basement and you hear a snap, perhaps a broken ankle and, although he probably can’t feel pain and despite being a monster, you actually feel a little bit sad that he’s injured himself and that his shuffling exploits will be a little more difficult.

All in all, Colin is a brilliant little film. Yes, the film quality suffers a little due to the manner of it’s making but you get used to it after a while. All in all I can highly recommend it. Four and a half pints out of five.



Zombie Month: Colin by Jamie

Zombies. As much as I love them, they’re not exactly have the most sparkling personalities of the monster world. They’re not seductive or lamenting of their curse like Vampires or Werewolves. No, they’re basically just walking corpses with a hunger for living flesh and aren’t really known for their conversation skills.

So I approached the film ‘Colin’ with a slight bit of scepticism because the basic premise is that our protagonist, Colin, becomes a Zombie within the first few minutes of the film and then we follow his journey as one of the Walking Dead. The fact that the film was allegedly made for around £45 didn’t do much to ease my… uneasiness. I’m not saying that low budget films can’t be good but they can definitely suffer for it and to have such an extreme low budget is enough to make a man think twice.

Still, I gave it a go and honestly, I’m fairly glad that I did. The plot isn’t far beyond what I’ve already stated. Just a Zombie wandering through a Zombie Apocalypse ravaged city in Britain. As he goes from place to place, you get little snapshots of what’s going on around him. He comes across various survivors all trying to cope in different ways with the end of the world. Some of them try to steal his shoes, some are weird Irish men who keep Zombie girls in their basement and some are relatives who recognise him and want him to recognise them.

Saying anything more than that would probably be travelling in to spoiler territory. Though, it’d be kind of hard to spoil this film. Nothing really happens yet at the same time so much is happening. For the most part, Colin is an impassionate observer apart from the scenes involving his family. He just shuffles along, occasionally taking the odd bite out of the odd corpse or incapacitated living person though his desire for flesh doesn’t seem to be as strong as that of his Zombie brethren. There are a number of times when he seems to pass up on a relatively easy meal, choosing instead to just walk on by.

There are certain clues through out the film to exactly what mental level Colin is operating on though it’s never made entirely clear. Does he forgo eating someone because they remind him of a person he knew whilst alive? Does he recognise his family on same basic level but, by the time they have him trapped in their kitchen has it been so long since he last had a meal that his Zombie instincts are over-riding his brain? It’s difficult to say.

The most important thing about the film is that, despite being a flesh-eating walking corpse, Colin is a sympathetic character. When bad things happen to him, you feel sorry for him. There’s a scene where he falls into a basement and you hear a snap, perhaps a broken ankle and, although he probably can’t feel pain and despite being a monster, you actually feel a little bit sad that he’s injured himself and that his shuffling exploits will be a little more difficult.

All in all, Colin is a brilliant little film. Yes, the film quality suffers a little due to the manner of it’s making but you get used to it after a while. All in all I can highly recommend it. Four and a half pints out of five.



Zombie Month: Beneath Still Waters by Jamie

Spain recently came onto the world wide Zombie scene with ‘Rec’, a film which I loved, and ‘Rec 2’, a film which kinda missed the mark for me. But two years before the original ‘Rec’, a film was released which also had what can be described as Zombies in it. And, like ‘Rec’, the film was tinged with Satanic myth and lore. That film was ‘Beneath Still Waters’ and it’s the subject of today’s Zombie Month review. Let’s dig in. Spoilers ahead

The film opens in Northern Spain in 1965. Two boys frolic through the Spanish fields before entering a village which has been fenced off. The reason for this is that the town is being slowly flooded due to a new dam being built. The water is already up to the boys shins as they wade through, playing and laughing and having fun. Oh, what a jolly thing to be a young boy in Northern Spain in 1965. Or so you’d think. Unfortunately, shit’s about to get real.

The boys stumble across a building with screams coming from and a firey glow in the windows. One of the boys decides they should go in and try and help these people who are clearly trapped in some way. They enter and soon find themselves in a basement where the occupants are chained to the floor, wailing and screaming and making all manner of unpleasant noises. The braver boy goes to help them when a voice in the corner calls him over, telling him to ignore them and free him instead which the boy does. The man, Mordecai Salas, who you know is evil because is name is Mordecai, immediately turns on the boy, forces his hands into his mouth and tears is head in two. Where was the Facebook child abuse status campaign when it was really needed in 1965 Northern Spain, huh? No where, that’s where. The other boy, understandably terrified by this, turns and runs, presumably shitting and pissing himself all the way home.

So then the movie cuts to 2005 and the people in the town that used to neighbour Floodville are celebrating the 40th anniversary of the construction of the dam. A photo journalist by the name of Dan Quarry is there, taking pictures of the submerged village and local TV reporter and daughter of the recently deceased town mayor, Teresa Borgia is reporting on the big party for the dam because I guess people really have nothing better to do in Northern Spain than celebrate big concrete walls that hold water back.

There is a problem and soon there are a series of mysterious deaths and disappearances, particularly around the reservoir. One early death is that of a friend of Teresa’s daughter Clara who’s also been having weird dreams lately about her dead grandfather warning her that someone is back. That someone is, of course, Mordecai Salas, who reminds me more and more of Keith Richards as the film progresses. Isn’t it weird that Keith Richards is now a part of a major Disney franchise? Anyway, the weird shit escalates including the odd Zombie like creature popping up here and there.

The first Zombie you really see attacks the dam supervisor, who’s hiding the fact that the dam has a huge crack in it for some reason. Anyway, the Zombie that attacks him kinda looks like a three way cross between the last Zombie from Rec, Nosferatu and the Dad from ‘Mac and Me’. If you’ve read my post about the Five Terrifying Monsters From My Childhood then you probably already know that this scene kinda creeped me out a little. Not as much as that bastard alien did but still, a little.

Anyway, Zombie’s pop up here and there, killer plants trap people and turn them into weird Zombie things too and the party at the dam becomes a massive demonically possessed orgy, much to my approval. Teresa and Dan decide to seek out the young boy, Louis, who lost his friends all those years ago. He explains that Salas was a student of Satanism and fuelled his power with sacrifices from amongst his followers in the village. Teresa’s father cottoned onto this and, in order to save the area from his evil, he bought up the land and had the dam built. As a final measure, he had Salas and his followers chained up in the basement of the building so that the flood would trap them forever. And everything would have gone according to plan if it hadn’t been for those two meddling kids.

So now that the old mayor is dead, Salas is back to wreak his terrible vengeance upon the people town that flooded his clan by letting his demonic influence infest the town and causing the dam to break. Apparently the only person who can stop him is Clara and so he goes after her. Louis, Dan and Teresa set out to stop him, with Louis getting torn apart in the process. Dan visit’s the submerged village in order to burn Salas’ magic book in the basement he was trapped and Teresa goes to find Clara.

Salas already has her and is about to tear her to head in two when Dan succeeds in destroying the book. Salas is defeated, everything returns back to normal and the dam doesn’t break. Except ten it does. The End.

So that’s the basic story. I’ve skipped over a few other plot points and storylines because honestly, this film has a lot going on. Too much really. And that’s the films biggest problem. There’s just too much going on here for me to really care about everything. There’s the backstory of Teresa and her father, Clara and her grandfather, Dan and his son, Clara’s best friend…. It goes on and on. Cut out a few of those extraneous plots and you could have had quite a neat little movie here.

The acting’s also a bit of a problem. I had no real problem with any of the major characters but some of the side characters were so woefully inept that it took it too a ridiculous level. Still, the special effects were pretty awesome and largely practical which was nice. In particular I really enjoyed the look of the Zombies and this one dude who was sitting there laughing maniacally whilst hacking his own limbs off. Awesome.

So ‘Beneath Still Waters’ was actually quite a surprisingly entertaining film. There were moments where it got pretty damn slow, mainly because of the mess of fucking storylines that it was trying to resolve all at once but on the whole, not bad. Three pints out of five.



Zombie Month: Beneath Still Waters by Jamie

Spain recently came onto the world wide Zombie scene with ‘Rec’, a film which I loved, and ‘Rec 2’, a film which kinda missed the mark for me. But two years before the original ‘Rec’, a film was released which also had what can be described as Zombies in it. And, like ‘Rec’, the film was tinged with Satanic myth and lore. That film was ‘Beneath Still Waters’ and it’s the subject of today’s Zombie Month review. Let’s dig in. Spoilers ahead

The film opens in Northern Spain in 1965. Two boys frolic through the Spanish fields before entering a village which has been fenced off. The reason for this is that the town is being slowly flooded due to a new dam being built. The water is already up to the boys shins as they wade through, playing and laughing and having fun. Oh, what a jolly thing to be a young boy in Northern Spain in 1965. Or so you’d think. Unfortunately, shit’s about to get real.

The boys stumble across a building with screams coming from and a firey glow in the windows. One of the boys decides they should go in and try and help these people who are clearly trapped in some way. They enter and soon find themselves in a basement where the occupants are chained to the floor, wailing and screaming and making all manner of unpleasant noises. The braver boy goes to help them when a voice in the corner calls him over, telling him to ignore them and free him instead which the boy does. The man, Mordecai Salas, who you know is evil because is name is Mordecai, immediately turns on the boy, forces his hands into his mouth and tears is head in two. Where was the Facebook child abuse status campaign when it was really needed in 1965 Northern Spain, huh? No where, that’s where. The other boy, understandably terrified by this, turns and runs, presumably shitting and pissing himself all the way home.

So then the movie cuts to 2005 and the people in the town that used to neighbour Floodville are celebrating the 40th anniversary of the construction of the dam. A photo journalist by the name of Dan Quarry is there, taking pictures of the submerged village and local TV reporter and daughter of the recently deceased town mayor, Teresa Borgia is reporting on the big party for the dam because I guess people really have nothing better to do in Northern Spain than celebrate big concrete walls that hold water back.

There is a problem and soon there are a series of mysterious deaths and disappearances, particularly around the reservoir. One early death is that of a friend of Teresa’s daughter Clara who’s also been having weird dreams lately about her dead grandfather warning her that someone is back. That someone is, of course, Mordecai Salas, who reminds me more and more of Keith Richards as the film progresses. Isn’t it weird that Keith Richards is now a part of a major Disney franchise? Anyway, the weird shit escalates including the odd Zombie like creature popping up here and there.

The first Zombie you really see attacks the dam supervisor, who’s hiding the fact that the dam has a huge crack in it for some reason. Anyway, the Zombie that attacks him kinda looks like a three way cross between the last Zombie from Rec, Nosferatu and the Dad from ‘Mac and Me’. If you’ve read my post about the Five Terrifying Monsters From My Childhood then you probably already know that this scene kinda creeped me out a little. Not as much as that bastard alien did but still, a little.

Anyway, Zombie’s pop up here and there, killer plants trap people and turn them into weird Zombie things too and the party at the dam becomes a massive demonically possessed orgy, much to my approval. Teresa and Dan decide to seek out the young boy, Louis, who lost his friends all those years ago. He explains that Salas was a student of Satanism and fuelled his power with sacrifices from amongst his followers in the village. Teresa’s father cottoned onto this and, in order to save the area from his evil, he bought up the land and had the dam built. As a final measure, he had Salas and his followers chained up in the basement of the building so that the flood would trap them forever. And everything would have gone according to plan if it hadn’t been for those two meddling kids.

So now that the old mayor is dead, Salas is back to wreak his terrible vengeance upon the people town that flooded his clan by letting his demonic influence infest the town and causing the dam to break. Apparently the only person who can stop him is Clara and so he goes after her. Louis, Dan and Teresa set out to stop him, with Louis getting torn apart in the process. Dan visit’s the submerged village in order to burn Salas’ magic book in the basement he was trapped and Teresa goes to find Clara.

Salas already has her and is about to tear her to head in two when Dan succeeds in destroying the book. Salas is defeated, everything returns back to normal and the dam doesn’t break. Except ten it does. The End.

So that’s the basic story. I’ve skipped over a few other plot points and storylines because honestly, this film has a lot going on. Too much really. And that’s the films biggest problem. There’s just too much going on here for me to really care about everything. There’s the backstory of Teresa and her father, Clara and her grandfather, Dan and his son, Clara’s best friend…. It goes on and on. Cut out a few of those extraneous plots and you could have had quite a neat little movie here.

The acting’s also a bit of a problem. I had no real problem with any of the major characters but some of the side characters were so woefully inept that it took it too a ridiculous level. Still, the special effects were pretty awesome and largely practical which was nice. In particular I really enjoyed the look of the Zombies and this one dude who was sitting there laughing maniacally whilst hacking his own limbs off. Awesome.

So ‘Beneath Still Waters’ was actually quite a surprisingly entertaining film. There were moments where it got pretty damn slow, mainly because of the mess of fucking storylines that it was trying to resolve all at once but on the whole, not bad. Three pints out of five.



The Depress-A-Thon: When The Wind Blows by Jamie

The Cold War era was a great time for depressing media. The nuclear threat cast it’s long, dark shadow all across the globe as the threat of complete destruction was, for one of the first times in human history, very real. From the 50s you had the awesome nuclear safety videos telling people what to do in case of a bomb being dropped such as the infamous ‘Duck and Cover’ which seemed to serve no purpose other than ensuring you died looking like an idiot.

It was this era that gave rise to some of the great post-apocalyptic films as well. ‘Mad Max’, ‘Planet Of The Apes’ and ‘Terminator’ all owe something to growing fear over the complete annihilation of mankind but these films weren’t particularly true to life and largely dealt with the consequences of the apocalypse rather than the apocalypse itself. It is those films which deal with an actual nuclear attack and it’s consequences that are truly the most terrifying and depressing, things like ‘The Day After’, ‘Threads’ and the subject of today’s review ‘When The Wind Blows’.(Spoilers Ahead)

The film is an animated feature and if you’ve ever seen the charming, though also ultimately rather depressing, children’s Christmas film ‘The Snowman’ then the animation style should be rather familiar to you. The story follows Jim (John Mills) and Hilda Bloggs (Peggy Ashcroft), a retired couple living in a remote cottage somewhere in rural Sussex. Jim has become increasingly worried about the possibility of a nuclear strike against Britain and so has decided to follow governmental guidelines and build himself a bomb shelter out a few doors. Hilda is less concerned but indulges Jim in his paranoia, helping him when she can as long as doing so doesn’t interfere with her daily chores.

Both members of the Bloggs family are generally quite optimistic about what would happen if the bomb were to fall. Both grew up during the blitz and have fond memories of nights spent in Anderson Shelter’s and communities coming together to help each other in times of need. Jim in particular is incredibly trusting in the government and it’s ability to continue running the country in a forthright and proper manner should war break out. Neither of them seem to fully understand just exactly what a nuclear attack would mean for them and the people of Britain.

Jim finishes his shelter and, with Hilda’s help, begins to stock it with everything they need to survive the 48 weeks (which Jim later realises is actually 48 hours, a mistake made by his misreading of the official governmental pamphlet) he believes they are required to stay within the shelter to bypass the fallout from the bomb. Suddenly an announcement comes over the radio. The unthinkable has happened. The bomb is on its way. Jim and Hilda scramble to get into their homemade shelter and the explosion rocks their cottage.

The rest of the film deals with the aftermath of the bomb and the effect it has on Jima and Hilda as they re-emerge from their shelter. They find a world in which the countryside they live in is practically entirely dead, their water supply is cut off and even the milk and postmen haven’t managed to make their daily rounds.

Of course Jim isn’t too worried. He theorises that there are bound to be delays during the emergency period that immediately follows the bomb. He’s also adamant that the government are working as quickly as possible to sort everything out and get all of the countries basic infrastructure up and running again. He’s also sure that emergency medical teams will be making the rounds as well, checking up on people, which is a good thing because it seems as though the shock of the bomb is having detrimental effects on both his and Hilda’s health. Jim, it seems, is completely ignorant of the effects of prolonged exposure to radiation.

As the days pass, Jim and Hilda succumb more and more to the effects of radiation poisoning and help still doesn’t seem to becoming. Eventually they decide to crawl back into their shelter, just in case a second bomb is dropped. The film ends with the couple praying before it fades to black.

All in all the film is a stark look at just what effects the bomb would have on people who are in regions that lay outside a major target such as London. There’s would be a slow, agonising death brought on by exposure to the radioactive fallout. Despite this the film is actually quite comical in nature, with much of the comedy coming from Jim’s adherence to the governmental outlines, the couples quintessential Britishness and the couples general ignorance about the consequences of a nuclear attack. There impression of what will happen is coloured by their experiences during the blitz and they expect much the same will happen this time. Of course, it’s this ignorance of the consequences which ultimately spells Jim and Hilda’s doom.

It’s a poignant, funny yet ultimately depressing film that I really do recommend. If there’s one criticism I can make it’s that there are occasional trippy little musical sequences, in particular during a scene where Hilda is hanging up her washing whilst Jim builds his shelter, which seem to serve no purpose and really just doesn’t fit with the rest of the film. Otherwise it’s another excellent example of a brilliantly depressing film based on events which, at the time of it’s production, seemed all too possible. Four pints out of five. Laterz.




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