Cinepub


31 Days of Horror 11: Dark Skies (2013) by Jamie

Haunted house movies! They’re a Halloween staple what with their ghostly object stacking, ghostly images appearing on CCTV footage and ghostly alien abductions. Yeah, you read that right. Alien abductions. Dark Skies is a haunted house movie where the force behind everything going on are aliens rather than ghosts. The main problem being that the aliens in this film do much the same bullshit that ghosts do in these movies.

In your average haunting movie you can explain away a ghost opening a fridge and throwing all the food on the floor or taking all the canned goods and stacking them as the typical actions of a mischievous spirit. It’s just a poltergeist fucking with people because that’s what poltergeists do. These silly pranks stretch credibility, however, when we are asked to believe that they are the work of beings who have travelled millions of light-years. Are they a race of highly advanced high-school pranksters? What’s going to happen next? Are they going to beam a bag of burning dog shit onto my front porch and ring the doorbell before flying away at the speed of light? Am I going to wake up with several hours of missing time and a wedgie?

And then, after doing these little pranks, the aliens begin to get nasty for no reason other than we’re later told by an expert that this is just how this shit always goes down. Yes, this movie has an expert. In normal haunted house movies it’s a priest, a demonologist or a paranormal investigator. In this movie, it’s another abductee in the form of J K Simmons and he’s here to do what every expert in these movies does. Show up near the end to explain what the force wants, what you might to to avoid your fate and just how small of a chance you have of avoiding it.

In all honesty, I know I’m making it seem as though I hated this movie but I didn’t really. It’s enjoyable enough, it’s just that I resent the film makers trying to make me think this isn’t just another stupid haunted house movie because aliens. It is. It follows the exact same structure as these movies do except where you’d normally have someone say poltergeist or demon, they say Grey. Still, the acting is a notch above your average haunted house movie and I have something of a soft spot for the Greys due to my years of watching the X-Files as a kid. It’s biggest problem is that it does seem to drag in places but if it happened to be on I’d say give it a watch or you could watch the superior ‘Alien Abduction: Incident at Lake County‘ but then I’d recommend that above many things. God I love that movie. Anyway, three pints out of five. Laterz.

Dark_Skies_Poster



Review: Independence Day by Jamie

It’s hard to believe that our little America was 234 years old yesterday. It seems like only yesterday that you were dressing up like Natives and dumping our tea in the Boston harbour. Now look at you. All grown up with your own postal service, building codes and monuments. We’re so proud of you.

It’s equally hard to fathom that the film ‘Independence Day’ is fourteen years old. Seriously, just try and fathom that, I dare you. See? I told you. It’s practically unfathomable. Still I can remember watching this film in some tiny cinema in some backwater Essex town which name escapes me now but it was certainly between the time that Braintree’s cinema closed and it’s new one opened. It could have been anywhere but I can still remember thinking how weird it was that this place that was essentially a village had a cinema whilst Braintree, an averagely sized town had none. I think I saw ‘The Blair Witch Project’ in the same place.

Anyway, that’s besides the point. The point is that I can remember that I was blown away by the film back then. It was fucking awesome seeing all those alien spaceships and exploding monuments. What wasn’t to love? My excitement was probably heightened by the fact that I was an eleven year old seeing a 12 rated film in the cinema and also the fact that I was deep into my fascination with the paranormal back then, particularly aliens so the fact that this film referenced things like Roswell and Area 51 was just icing on the awesome cake for me. Still some things stuck out as odd to me even back then. In particular the portrayal of the British soldiers but I’ve already gone into that in my ‘2012’ review.

I remember even have the graphic novel adaptation of the film which I read on the way to the cinema, something that I certainly wouldn’t do now. Fuck I even try and avoid comedy trailers nowadays simply because I don’t want the funny bits of the film ruined. I loved this film so much that I even had a couple of the alien action figures. I thought they were awesome with their weird bio-mechanical suits and frail little inhabitants. Yes, I was completely sucked in by the awesome I perceived ‘Independence Day’ to be.

So what would it be like watching it again now? I have actually watched it since, well, watching it may be a bit of an exaggeration. Let’s just say it’s been on whilst I’ve been in the vicinity of the television. Yes, it was time to actually sit down and watch it properly… And then watch it with the Rifftrax commentary directly afterwards. If anything’s worth doing it’s worth doing right.

So what’s the film about? Really? You need me to explain it? Everyone’s seen it, right? Can I finish a sentence in this paragraph without a question mark? Yes. Yes I can.
Anyway the basic gist of the plot is that aliens come and attack Earth. A group of generally unrelated characters come together and fight back and save America and the rest of the world from the alien menace. That’s pretty much it.

So who are these disparate characters? Well, there’s uh… ummm J-Jeff… Ah, yes Jeff Goldblum playing Jeff Goldblum playing David Levinson. No, that wasn’t a typo. Jeff Goldblum basically brings his usual Jeff Goldblum thing to this character but hey, he’s good at it so who am I to complain? David is a genius who manages to figure out the aliens are planning to attack. He decides to travel to Washington with his father Jewlius Levinson played by Judd Hirsch… Sorry, that should be spelled Julius. I just got confused because Julius is perhaps the most stereotypical portrayal of a New York Jewish character ever portrayed on screen. Seriously, he’s meshuga with the over the top Yiddish. Oy vey.

Anyway as I was saying, they schlep to Washington to meet David’s ex-wife Constance Spano (Margaret Colin) who just happens to be an advisor to President Thomas J. Whitmore (Bill Pullman). In fact it was her decision to further her career in politics that caused their divorce. Still right now David needs to see the President so I guess it all conveniently worked out for the best.

Meanwhile The Fresh Prince of the US Air Force Captain Steve Miller (Will Smith) is having problems. The first is that he wants to become an astronaut but is finding it difficult because he is in love with Jasmine Dubrow (Vivica A. Fox), a stripper, and NASA apparently has very strict rules against hiring people as astronauts if they want to marry a stripper. His second problem is that his Fourth of July weekend has been cancelled thanks to the massively inconvenience of an alien invasion. Thirdly, he has the most annoying best friend in the history of the world, Captain Jimmy Wilder (Harry Conick Jr). Thankfully the aliens sort out his third problem for him.

Even more meanwhile redneck drunkard Russell Casse (Randy Quaid) is having issues due to an alien abduction related incident ten years prior. It causes him all sorts of drink related problems such as crop-dusting the wrong fields and being a really, really shitty father. He’s just been looking for a chance to get back at those extra-terrestrial bastards and it looks like he might finally get it.

So that’s your main cast I guess. There are a few other characters that round the whole thing out like the president’s other employees, William Grey (Robert Loggia) , the wise but gruff military general and Albert Mimzki (James Rebhorn), the nuke happy, douche bag Secretary of Defence. There’s also wacky Area 51 researcher Dr. Brackish Okun, a man apparently so despised by his own parents that they named him after salty water and Marilyn Whitmore (Mary McDonnell), the First Lady who may or may not die in order to provide a poignant moment. By the way, she totally dies. Seriously though, they should have let her play the president, though I may be biased by my complete love of Battlestar Galactica.

So does the film hold up these days? Do I still believe it to be an unrelenting pile of awesome? Well, no. The special effects certainly look a little shoddy these days especially the scene with the incredible slow moving fireball in the tunnel which Jasmine, her son and their dog manage to escape by escaping into a maintenance room. The green screen effect is pretty fucking horrible, probably even by the standards of big blockbusters in the 90s. Plus there doesn’t seem to be much in the way of detail on the spaceships, more the illusion of detail… That’s not fair perhaps but what I’m talking about specifically is the giant death ray on the bottom of the ships. There’s just some metal bits and then a lot of ill-defined blue stuff.

As for the story it’s certainly true that much has been made of the ending where David and Steve manage to upload a computer virus into the alien ships systems and with good reason. It’s perhaps one of the most patently ridiculous plot points in any movie ever made. Seriously. If Macs are safe from the majority of viruses that can seriously shit up a Windows PC then how are we able to accept that we could infect a completely alien computer network with one? That shit just doesn’t make sense. And yes, I realise that it’s all supposed to be a modern, technological reference to ‘The War of the Worlds’ with the cold that wiped out the aliens replaced with a computerised version instead but I don’t care. As I previously stated, that shit just doesn’t make sense.

I suppose I can’t really finish this without bringing up President Whitmore’s little speech. Now thanks to the magical wonders of someone who can’t hold a camera still filming their television screen whilst the scene is playing, we can watch it. Let‘s do that, won‘t we?

Well, what can I say about it? Is it a bit cheesy, over-emotional and over-patriotic? Yes, yes it is. But then so is America. Don’t get me wrong, America, it’s these very qualities which endear you to me. I may not understand your rampant patriotism or emotionalism and there’re certainly not everyone’s cup of tea or light beer or whatever it is you drink in the States but I can find them charming in the same way that you find our Britishness quaint and endearing. Unfortunately the emotional impact of this scene is somewhat hampered by that whole British soldiers thing I mentioned earlier which happened but a few moments earlier.

And despite all the bad stuff I’ve said about this film, there’s an undeniable quality to it that just makes it somewhat entertaining. Sure there isn’t actually as much action and blowing shit up as you might expect from a sci-fi summer blockbuster and there are definite sections of the film which just seem to lull for what seems like an inordinate amount of time and the characters may all be cardboard cut-outs or stereotypes with no real reason to care but still about them but the movie somehow overcomes all those little problems to do what it sets out to do. Much like a little band of colonies did some 234 years ago. Happy America Everybody!

Oh, also the scene where the White House blows up is still pretty awesome.



Five Terrifying Monsters From My Childhood by Jamie

Childhood is generally a magical time filled with wonder and amazement but it is also a horrific nightmare filled with monsters. Many of these evil creatures come from watching film and they leave a lasting impression that lingers with us for the rest of our lives, lurking at all times in the back of our mind. This then is a list of some of those things which still haunt my brain to this very day. Warning: Here Be Spoilers

5. Greys (Close Encounters Of The Third Kind, The X-Files, countless other things)

Whether you believe that they actually exist or not, and personally I don’t, there is something undeniably creepy about the alien species generally referred to as the Greys. There’s something about their huge black eyes and largely feature-less face that causes some kind of primal fear. I think it’s something to do with the fact that they seem completely emotionless and you can’t tell what they are thinking. There’s also the way that they are often depicted as moving in films.

Take the way that the ‘leader’ from Close Encounters moves. It‘s got a disturbing weirdness to it‘s movement, probably something to do with the limitations of the special effects but still. In other media they aren’t portrayed as anything less than terrifying, generally performing some kind of medical procedure, never saying a word just carrying out their tasks in an almost deliberate, robotic fashion.

Then there’s a film called Alien Abduction: The McPherson Tape. It’s a hand-held, Blair Witch style film that tells the tale of a family practically held hostage within their own home by some Greys that they‘ve managed to piss off. It’s cheesy as fuck but when I was younger it used to terrify me, particularly the last scene which was just creepy as fuck. Oh, and there’s also an interview with a British musician who is an alleged abductee (Actually just an actor portraying the role to try and keep up the premise that the video is real found footage) who uses the phrase ‘Big Headed Wankers’ which used to amuse me and my brothers to no end. It’s actually on YouTube, part one can be found here.

4. The Wheelers (Return To Oz)

The Wheelers are like a monstrous amalgamation of people, bicycles and hyenas. They hunt their prey on the wheels that they have in place of hands and feet, laughing like maniacs as they do so. Of course the question which is immediately raised in your mind is ‘But Jamie, if they don’t have hands, how can they possibly catch that which they are chasing?’ And whilst it’s not actually raised in the film, I have my theory.

Surely, since their hands are fucking wheels, they only have one possible method for catching their quarry and that must be their mouths. Yes, I put it to you that the Wheeler’s capture and then eat their prey. That is fucking horrible. And guess what else they do. They wear helmets which, when their head is turned down towards the ground, has a second, creepier face on it!

I will say this though, they be some stylin’ motherfuckers. They got these long sleeved, clown-esque jackets which they often accessorise with multi-coloured pipes. Above that they wear those things which I can’t remember the name of. Not sure If I ever knew the name of them actually. They often appear in cartoons involving conductors or opera singers and a character will generally grab it and roll it up like a window blind. You know the thing I’m talking about. They also wear colourful bowties. Nice.

3. The Skeksis (The Dark Crystal)

Who doesn’t love The Dark Crystal? It’s a classic in the puppet/fantasy genre and it features the innocent Gelflings, the wise urRu and the… Holy Fucking Shit! What is that hideous vulture dinosaur thing?!?! Oh dear God, keep it away! Keep it away!

Yes, the Skeksis, the evil side of the once benevolent UrSkeks race which, as we all know, was splintered into two separate races, along with the urRu, when the Dark Crystal was fractured. The Skeksis have ruled their world for over a thousand years going so far as to commit genocide against the Gelfling due to a prophecy that a Gelfling would bring an end to their rule. Not only are they evil monsters but they are evil monsters who take superstition and myth seriously. Sure the prophecy turned out to be true but it was probably quite self-fulfilling.

So terrified was I by the Skeksis when I was younger that even to this day, whenever The Dark Crystal is brought up in conversation my mother helpfully informs everyone of just how much they used to frighten me. Seriously though who could blame me? I mean just look at them, they are the very embodiment of a child’s third worst nightmare. Thankyou Jim Henson for improving my life by inventing The Muppets, Sesame Street, The Fraggles and Dinosaurs and for scarring me for life by creating The Dark Crystal and making me want to stab/shit myself in terror whenever I see a vulture. I’ve had some pretty awkward moments being ejected from zoos, I can tell you.

2. The Child Catcher (Chitty Chitty Bang Bang)

The country of Vulgaria seems like quite a nice place to visit despite the awful name it suffers from. With it’s Bavarian architecture and cobbled streets it seems like the kind of place that would make really good chocolate and beer. But after staying there for a while you’d notice a disturbing lack of children and disturbing number of depressed toy-makers played by Benny Hill. You see the problem is that the Baron of Vulgaria is a child-hating, toy-loving lunatic (which I admit makes it sound like he and I would get on quite well) who has hired one of the most terrifying characters ever capture on celluloid to hunt down and capture children.

This horrible, mincing freak with his top hat and elongated nose has haunted the dreams of many a child. There’s just something so… paedophiley about him. He’d stalk the streaks of Vulgaria with his cage disguised as a free treats cart offering sweets and ice-cream to any child who happened to cross his path making us all afraid to trust those perfectly nice strangers who would offer us sweets in the park. Bastard.

To top it all off he could actually smell children! How the fuck do you escape a villain with that kind of power? You can’t hide from him because his powerful nostrils would flare and he’d soon find you. One offer of a free sweet later and BAM! You’re locked up in some dungeon type place, never to see your parents again. There is one question I do have though: When the children grow up, were they freed from their subterranean prison? I can’t imagine that the population of Vulgaria would grow if they didn’t and I’m sure it would affect morale within the country if you citizens had spent the formative years of their lives locked in a fucking dungeon by their leader.

1. The Father (Mac and Me)

This is it. The big one and I’m sure I’ll be mostly alone on it. Mac and Me was a film which tried to capitalise on the success of E.T. by being released six years later and having a shittier but similar story. I’ve kind of reviewed it before and so I shan’t go into all the plot details again. I’ll just say that there are a few things that this film is famous for a number of things. One is the scene involving the main kid in the wheelchair flying over a cliff which used to played on Conan O’Brien when Paul Rudd would come on to promote a film. The second is that the film was really nothing more than a shameless plug for McDonalds, Skittles and Coca-Cola. There is an impromptu dance number in the middle of a McDonalds, Ronald and everything. It’s pretty fucked up.

Anyway the reason that this film sticks in my mind is because of Mac’s father, an unnamed alien who used to scare the shit out of me as a kid. There was something about his gaunt expressionless face that terrified me. It never changed no matter whether he was lying dying in a cave or whether he was wielding a gun in a supermarket. Yes. That actually happened and I’m sure it did nothing to reassure me that the creature wasn’t the most horrific thing a human had ever thought up.

This was literally the best picture I could find of Mac’s dad. When the internet refuses to have a picture of something, you know it’s horrific.

The way he moved scared me as well. His awkward, drunken gait as he stumbled around, his lanky arms occasionally flailing around to randomly smack at something. Oh god, just the thought of him now terrifies me. Seriously, the image of that bastard has been so seared into my mind as the worst thing imaginable that I literally have trouble seeing that film today. Every time he appears on screen a small shiver of fear judders up my mind and hits something deep and primal within my brain.

Well, that’s that. I’m sure I’ve forgotten more than one thing that also scared me when I was a kid or perhaps I’ve just blocked it from my mind as some kind of safety mechanism to keep myself sane. Until I can regress myself and remember what those things were, we’ll just leave it here. Laterz.



Review: District 9 by Jamie
I don’t think it’ll come as much of a shock that I think this has been a pretty bad year for films. Sure, there was Star Trek and I liked The Watchmen more than some internet folks seemed to but things like Transformers: Revenge of the Fallen and Friday the 13th just can’t be overlooked and oh how I wish they could be. I held out hope, however, for one shining jewel in this sea of mediocrity and downright awfulness and that hope lay in the hands of a movie set in South Africa which was odd because, and I’m sorry to any South Africans out there, I’m just not a big fan of that accent. I don’t know what it is, it just doesn’t appeal to my ears in the same way that, say, an Australian accent does.
Still I’d have to get over my inexplicable dislike for the South African accent because 2009’s place was entirely down to District 9… For me at least. Yes Star Trek was good but it essentially was nothing more than a big budget summer action flick with thousands of nods to the original series and Watchmen was good too but it was certainly no ‘The Dark Knight’. So did District 9 disappoint or did it leave me with a vague sense that maybe this year was worth something after all?
Well I’m happy to say that District 9 did not disappoint at all but it also certainly wasn’t what I was expecting. The film manages to blend several different genres which can be a little disconcerting at first but ultimately works to the films benefit. So what is District 9 about exactly, I hear you ask quickly followed up by a question concerning whether or not I can finish the next paragraph without the obvious crutch of posing myself a question.
Well the film begins with a documentary style segment which espouses some of the back story of the world of District 9. It seems that some twenty odd years ago a giant space ship appeared over the city of Johannesburg. Wow. If Lethal Weapon 2 has taught me anything it’s that South Africa in the 1980s is not a place that you want to accidentally end up in. Apparently it was full of racism and evil diplomats. So it is in this politically volatile landscape that mankind first finds that he is not alone in the universe. For months the spaceship hovers there doing absolutely nothing. Soon the South African government, feeling the eyes of the world bearing down upon them decide to investigate the strange craft. They fly some helicopters up to it, blow torch there way inside only to find a ship covered in a putrid decaying mess and a room filled with thousands of terrified insect-like aliens.
It seems as though these aliens work on some kind of caste system, much like ants on Earth, and all the members of the higher castes have died leaving a massive worker population with absolutely no direction. The South African government ferries the aliens down to the surface where they join the population of Johannesburg much to the chagrin of the general populace. Soon the Multi National United corporation or MNU offers to help South Africa with it’s alien problem and puts the creatures, labelled with the derogatory term ‘prawns’, into a special area known as District 9. Conflicts between the human and alien populations still arise however and plans are made to move the prawns into a new concentration campesque area known as District 10 many miles away from the human citizens of Johannesburg. This operation is over seen by new promoted Wikus Van De Merwe, a man with a fairly rich home life and a comfortable position as son-in-law of the company’s boss.
It’s not long after this that the film begins to intercut the documentary style with a more traditional summer blockbuster feel as well as borrowing and paying homage to a few other genres of film as well. It manages to incorporate action, adventure, socio-political themes, sci-fi, horror (with a very Fly-esque scene which had me looking away from the screen.) and even manages to throw in a little bit of a throwback to the old buddy cop films of the 80s… like Lethal Weapon 2. Everything eventually comes back to Lethal Weapon 2.
The film does have a message about apartheid, segregation and refugees but it isn’t particularly heavy handed about getting that message across. In fact I’d imagine it would be entirely possible to view this film without even thinking about it on any level deeper than seeing it as a plot point that helps further the story along. Admittedly you’d probably have to be kinda slow to take it that way but I’m just suggesting it’s possible. I’d also say that the message is fairly balanced addressing both the plight of the refugee prawns and the human population affected by their sudden appearance.
The film isn’t as serious as I thought it would be either with plenty of pieces of humour sprinkled liberally throughout including a picture suggesting that Wikus engages in some rather sexually rich activities with some of the prawns. Don’t get me wrong though, when the film wants to it can deliver some truly heart wrenching scenes particularly when making you feel sorry for some of the prawns, including what can only be described as an horrific abortion scene, and in particular one called Christopher Johnson and his offspring.
Well I don’t want to give too much away so I’m going to pretty much leave it there. I’ll wind up by just addressing one point of criticism I’ve heard levelled against this film and that’s that it’s full of plot holes. Now I’ll admit there a few things that, upon first viewing, might not seem to add up but I can say that watching the film more than once definitely helped. I would classify these apparent plot holes more as mysteries that you’re supposed to think about for yourself and besides since this film did so well I’m sure some of them will be addressed in the inevitable sequel.
Well that’s my review of District 9. Sorry for not doing it earlier but festival don’t attend themselves. Laterz.

I don’t think it’ll come as much of a shock that I think this has been a pretty bad year for films. Sure, there was ‘Star Trek’ and I liked ‘Watchmen’ more than some internet folks seemed to but things like ‘Transformers: Revenge of the Fallen’ and ‘Friday the 13th’ just can’t be overlooked and oh how I wish they could be. I held out hope, however, for one shining jewel in this sea of mediocrity and downright awfulness and that hope lay in the hands of a movie set in South Africa which was odd because, and I’m sorry to any South Africans out there, I’m just not a big fan of that accent. I don’t know what it is, it just doesn’t appeal to my ears in the same way that, say, an Australian accent does.

Still I’d have to get over my inexplicable dislike for the South African accent because 2009’s place was entirely down to ‘District 9’… For me at least. Yes Star Trek was good but it essentially was nothing more than a big budget summer action flick with thousands of nods to the original series and Watchmen was good too but it was certainly no ‘The Dark Knight’. So did District 9 disappoint or did it leave me with a vague sense that maybe this year was worth something after all?

Well I’m happy to say that District 9 did not disappoint at all but it also certainly wasn’t what I was expecting. The film manages to blend several different genres which can be a little disconcerting at first but ultimately works to the films benefit. So what is District 9 about exactly, I hear you ask quickly followed up by a question concerning whether or not I can finish the next paragraph without the obvious crutch of posing myself a question.

Well the film begins with a documentary style segment which espouses some of the back story of the world of District 9. It seems that some twenty odd years ago a giant space ship appeared over the city of Johannesburg. Wow. If Lethal Weapon 2 has taught me anything it’s that South Africa in the 1980s is not a place that you want to accidentally end up in. Apparently it was full of racism and evil diplomats. So it is in this politically volatile landscape that mankind first finds that he is not alone in the universe. For months the spaceship hovers there doing absolutely nothing. Soon the South African government, feeling the eyes of the world bearing down upon them decide to investigate the strange craft. They fly some helicopters up to it, blow torch there way inside only to find a ship covered in a putrid decaying mess and a room filled with thousands of terrified insect-like aliens.

It seems as though these aliens work on some kind of caste system, much like ants on Earth, and all the members of the higher castes have died leaving a massive worker population with absolutely no direction. The South African government ferries the aliens down to the surface where they join the population of Johannesburg much to the chagrin of the general populace. Soon the Multi National United corporation or MNU offers to help South Africa with it’s alien problem and puts the creatures, labelled with the derogatory term ‘prawns’, into a special area known as District 9. Conflicts between the human and alien populations still arise however and plans are made to move the prawns into a new concentration campesque area known as District 10 many miles away from the human citizens of Johannesburg. This operation is over seen by new promoted Wikus Van De Merwe, a man with a fairly rich home life and a comfortable position as son-in-law of the company’s boss.

It’s not long after this that the film begins to intercut the documentary style with a more traditional summer blockbuster feel as well as borrowing and paying homage to a few other genres of film as well. It manages to incorporate action, adventure, socio-political themes, sci-fi, horror (with a very Fly-esque scene which had me looking away from the screen.) and even manages to throw in a little bit of a throwback to the old buddy cop films of the 80s… like Lethal Weapon 2. Everything eventually comes back to Lethal Weapon 2.

The film does have a message about apartheid, segregation and refugees but it isn’t particularly heavy handed about getting that message across. In fact I’d imagine it would be entirely possible to view this film without even thinking about it on any level deeper than seeing it as a plot point that helps further the story along. Admittedly you’d probably have to be kinda slow to take it that way but I’m just suggesting it’s possible. I’d also say that the message is fairly balanced addressing both the plight of the refugee prawns and the human population affected by their sudden appearance.

The film isn’t as serious as I thought it would be either with plenty of pieces of humour sprinkled liberally throughout including a picture suggesting that Wikus engages in some rather sexually rich activities with some of the prawns. Don’t get me wrong though, when the film wants to it can deliver some truly heart wrenching scenes particularly when making you feel sorry for some of the prawns, including what can only be described as an horrific abortion scene, and in particular one called Christopher Johnson and his offspring.

Well I don’t want to give too much away so I’m going to pretty much leave it there. I’ll wind up by just addressing one point of criticism I’ve heard levelled against this film and that’s that it’s full of plot holes. Now I’ll admit there a few things that, upon first viewing, might not seem to add up but I can say that watching the film more than once definitely helped. I would classify these apparent plot holes more as mysteries that you’re supposed to think about for yourself and besides since this film did so well I’m sure some of them will be addressed in the inevitable sequel.

Well that’s my review of District 9. Sorry for not doing it earlier but festivals don’t attend themselves. Laterz.



5 Top Films Still To Come In 2009 by Jamie

As you may know by now, I’ve been pretty disappointed with 2009 so far. In general it’s been a pretty goddamn terrible year for films what with shit like Wolverine, Friday the 13th and Transformers: Revenge of the Fallen hitting the screens. Sure there have been some bright sparks here and there but overall, it’s been pretty awful. Now the year is over halfway through so shouldn’t we just give up entirely? No because there are still some films to be released that I hope might bring the years overall score up a little. Let’s look at he top 5 films I’m still looking forward to.

5: Inglorious Basterds (UK/US release date: 21/08/2009)

Yes, Tarantino’s WWII themed spaghetti-western comes in at number 5. It has his largest cast of speaking roles in a flim so far and tells the story of a group of Jewish-American soldiers who are on a mission to kill as many Nazi’s as they possibly can while a Jewish girl attempts to avenge the death of her family at the hands of an SS Colonel referred to as ‘The Jew Hunter’.

Now, I generally love Tarantino films so I can help but look forward to this one, especially with a cast that includes Brad Pitt, who has been pretty consistently great in everything he’s been in since Fight Club. The film also boasts performances from Eli Roth, Mike Myers and the while things narrated by the bad motherfucker himself, Samuel L. Jackson. The only reason that this film isn’t higher is that the film recieved a bit of bad press when it was screened but it was still the only American film at the festival to recieve any kind of award so time will tell whether this film lives up to my expectations or just adds to the massive dissapointment of 2009.

4: Where The Wild Things Are (US release date: 16/10/09)

This is the story of a kid who wears weird pajamas who goes and plays with massive furry monsters voiced by Tony Soprano in a weird forest that gets bombed or something. I dunno, I never read the book as a kid as far as I can remember, which to be honest may have meant that I read it several times. I have a shit memory.

So the main reason I’ve put this on here is the technique of making the weird monster creatures is really interesting and, from the trailer at least, it looks as though it works really well. Will it actually be any good? As I understand the book it’s adapted from is actually really quite short and we all know where that can lead (The Grinch and The Cat in the Hat).

3: Taking Woodstock (US release date: 28/08/09)

Directed by Ang Lee this is an R rated comedy based on the true life story of Elliot Tiber, a guy whose parents owned a motel and the only music festival permit in Bethel, New York. He offered both of these things to the Woodstock Music Festival.

Now this film ticks a number of boxes that make me look forward to it. A cast of people I enjoy: Demetri Martin, Emile Hirsch, Eugene Levy. Tick. A subject that I’m interested in: Woodstock. Tick. R-Rated comedy. Tick. So all in all this film looks like it’s going to be right down my alley. Here’s hoping this isn’t another 2009 dissapointment.

2: Sherlock Holmes (UK release date: 25/12/09)

Guy Ritchie’s period action film about the world’s most famous detective (except maybe Batman) starring Robert Downie Jr. and Jude Law as the Victorian dynamic duo is certainly one to look forward to. I was a little concerned when I first saw the trailer, thinking that they’d made Holmes into some kind of 19th century James Bond but hey, the fashion these days is taking classic characters and reinvisioning them so why not Holmes too?

Also it’s got Robert Downie Jr. in it for fucks sake! He’s consistently proving that he’s one of the best actors we’ve got these days and I’m sure some people will soon begin complaining that he’s over-exposed but who cares as long as he can consistently deliver sterling performances?

1: District 9 (UK/US release date: 19/08/09)

I don’t think anyone should be surprised by this. In fact, is there anyone who’s not looking forward to this film? It’s the story of aliens living in a segregated community (District 9) in South Africa. The community is controlled by the human corporation Multi-National United (MNU) who have no interest in the aliens welfare. In fact the only thing the humans are interested in is their technology which won’t work without alien DNA. Suddenly an MNU worker contracts an alien virus which begins to mutate his genes, making him the key to humans being able to use the alien weaponry. He becomes a hunted man and, becoming ostracised and friendless, he takes shelter in the only place he can, District 9.

I’ll admit, I was a little shocked when the first full trailer came out and showed this was a far more straightforward film rather than the documentary style I had come to expect from the teasers but I get the feeling that there will probably be a decent mix of both styles which will make me very, very happy indeed. Man, I can’t wait for this to be released. In fact the only problem with District 9 is that it heavily features the worst accent on Earth. Sorry South Africans, but really, it’s like someone smacking my ears with a frying pan. Still, hopefully someone will say ‘Diplomatic Immunity.’ Then all will be well.




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